Ordinary maintenance

 

Conference of International Studies
Historical and Royal Residences in Europe. From Restoration to Maintenance
Monza-Milan, October 12-15, 2000

 

The aim of the Conference was to present and discuss various European experiences in the field of the protection and maintenance of the architectural heritage, with particular reference to royal and former-royal residences.
Contributions concern two distinct types of situations and experiences.
On one hand, those of countries where royal residences still belonging to the Crown exist. These were illustrated by a particularly significant number of buildings constituting the historical residences used by the royal families in Belgium, Denmark, Great Britain, Norway, Holland, Spain and Sweden.
On the other hand, experiences of countries in which former royal residences exist, were illustrated, such as that of Austria (Schloß Schönbrunn), France (Château de Versailles), and Italy, of which the experiences of the Reggia of Caserta, the Palazzo Reale of Neaples, the Quirinale, Palazzo Pitti, Palazzo Reale of Genoa, Racconigi, the Palazzo Reale of Venezia, the Palazzo Reale of Milan and the Villa Reale of Monza were presented.

Very different experiences, therefore, from the historical-geographical, technical, economic and cultural points of view, were compared, but they perhaps were sometimes joined together by the common thread of culture and a policy of restoration and maintenance.
The status of royal palaces in Europe is quite varied and complex, both from the legal point of view and from that of usage and purpose.
Some palaces belong to the Crown, others to Foundations or state administrations; some palaces are inhabited exclusively by royal families, some are partially or occasionally open to the public while others have become exclusively museums. There are palaces managed directly by the Royal Court and others where various bodies both inside and outside the Royal Court manage them.

As far as these palaces are concerned, the conference examined in detail not only technical matters such as maintenance and restoration but also the organisational and management aspects, especially in the royal residences still in use.
The situations in those countries where former royal palaces still exist are also varied and significant from the point of view of usage, purpose, management and maintenance.
As far as Italy is concerned, the Conference was a chance both to present studies and research on the history of the management and maintenance of some of these residences, and to assess these management strategies to determine their levels of success, both in order to discuss how much and how often maintenance is currently practised, the advantages it gives, the difficulties experienced and the programs that are currently being studied.

  • Is it true that in some countries, or in some situations, there still exists a more traditional mentality, inclined and educated towards maintenance?
  • In addition to that of the traditional state structures, what is the European outlook of the technical-institutional bodies responsible for the maintenance of some of the most important historical residences on the continent? What tasks are they carrying out currently, and what are the possible differences that exist in their principles, methods, aims and instrumentation, compared with the policy followed by the state?
  • And again: which criteria are adopted in defining and dealing with maintenance? who decides what must be maintained, repaired, restored or renovated, how and when and using which procedures? and how many economic resources are needed and how must these be used?
  • The aim of the conference was to find an answers to these important and very timely questions and does not hide a further aim – that of spreading even further, the culture of restoration and maintenance, in Italy and the world.

The Conference was also, more in general, an opportunity to assess what possible repercussions the examples given may have on the wider architectural heritage of historical residences in Italy, whether these be privately owned or the property of public bodies.
 

Promoters:
Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Conservazione e Storia dell’Architettura
Politecnico di Milano, Scuola di Specializzazione in Restauro dei Monumenti -
Associazione Giovanni Secco Suardo.


Participant Institutions:

European Commission, General Directorate for Education and Culture
Regione Lombardia, Direzione Generale alle Culture, Identità e Autonomie della Lombardia
Provincia di Milano, Assessorato alla Cultura
Comune di Milano, Assessorato alla Cultura
Comune di Monza, Assessorato alla Cultura
Musei e Villa Reale,
Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Conservazione e Storia dell’Architettura
Politecnico di Milano, Scuola di Specializzazione in Restauro dei Monumenti
Associazione Giovanni Secco Suardo
Associazione per la Villa reale di Monza.

Under the patronage of
Ministero per i Beni e le Attività Culturali, Roma
Ministero dell’Istruzione, Roma
CNR - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Roma
ICR - Istituto Centrale per il Restauro, Roma
ECCO - European Confederation of Conservator-Restorers Organisations, Bruxelles Europa Nostra
Europa Nostra
ICCROM - International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property, Roma
ICOM - International Council of Museums - Comitato Internazionale Dimore Storiche, Milano
ICOMOS - International Coucil on Monuments and Sites, Parigi
ADSI - Associazione Dimore Storiche Italiane, Roma (membro dell’Union of European Historic Houses Association)
ADSI - Associazione Dimore Storiche Italiane – Sezione Lombardia, Milano
FAI - Fondo per l’Ambiente Italiano, Milano
Italia Nostra, Roma
Italia Nostra - Sezione di Bergamo, Bergamo

Partners
IRPA - Institut Royal du Patrimoine Artistique (Belgio)
The Royal Danish Collection at Rosenborg Castle (Danimarca)
Historic Royal Palaces, Department of Surveyor of the Fabric (Gran Bretagna)



STEERING COMMITTEE

  • Cristina Aschengreen Piacenti (Museo Stibbert, Firenze)
  • Giuseppe Basile (Istituto Centrale per il Restauro, Roma)
  • Amedeo Bellini (Scuola di Specializzazione in Restauro dei Monumenti, Politecnico Milano)
  • Ninfa Cannada Bartoli (Direzione Generale alle Culture, Identità Autonomie della Lombardia, Regione Lombardia)
  • Roberto Cassanelli (Musei Civici Villa Reale, Monza)
  • Bruno Contardi (Soprintendenza Beni Artistici e Storici, Milano)
  • Paolo Maria Farina (Dipartimento di Conservazione e Storia dell’Architettura, Facoltà di Architettura, Politecnico Milano)
  • Lucia Gremmo (Soprintendenza Beni Ambientali e Architettonici, Milano)
  • Maria Teresa Jaquinta (ICCROM International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of cultural Property, Roma)
  • Jean-Louis Luxen (ICOMOS International Coucil on Monuments and Sites, Parigi)
  • Annamaria Pandolfi (Istituto Centrale per il Restauro, Roma)
  • Pietro Petraroia (Direttore Generale alle Culture, Identità e Autonomie della Lombardia, Regione Lombardia)
  • Giovanni Pinna (ICOM, International Council of Museum – Comitato Internazionale Dimore Storiche Musei, Milano)
  • Giuliana Ricci (Dipartimento di Conservazione e Storia dell’Architettura, Facoltà di Architettura, Politecnico Milano)
  • Lanfranco Secco Suardo (Associazione Giovanni Secco Suardo, Bergamo)
  • Sabina Vedovello (Conservatore-Restauratore, Roma)

 

 

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